Archives

No More Night

There will be no more night

The timeless theme, Earth and Heaven will pass away.
It’s not a dream; God will make all things new that day.
Gone is the curse from which I stumbled and fell.
Evil is banished to eternal hell.

No more night. No more pain.
No more tears. Never crying again.
And praises to the great “I AM.”
We will live in the light of the risen Lamb.

See all around, now the nations bow down to sing.
The only sound is the praises to Christ, our King.
Slowly the names from the book are read.
I know the King, so there’s no need to dread.

No more night. No more pain.
No more tears. Never crying again.
And praises to the great “I AM.”
We will live in the light of the risen Lamb.

See over there, there’s a mansion, oh, that’s prepared just for me,
Where I will live with my savior eternally.

Walt Harrah

“There will be no more night. They will not need the light of a lamp or the light of the sun, for the Lord God will give them light. And they will reign forever and ever.” (Revelation 22:5)

Watch and listen “No More Night “by Walt Harrah. Music arranging by Greg Howlet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4Y4eWniH5o&list=RD02NKex7c7DzMA

Photo credit: photobucket.com

Trust and Obey

Trust and obey 2

Yesterday when we held a gratefully worship for my 56th dad’s birthday, my dad asked to the worship leader to sing his favorite hymn song called “Trust and obey” which composed by Daniel Tower (1850-1919) and John Sammis (1846-1919). For my daddy this song become his life-theme and because it sums up God’s purpose for his entire lives.

He once said to me: “When the Lord calls you to a task that seems unreasonable, you have two options. You can obey Him even though you don’t understand what will happen, or you can become fearful and attempt to find a way out. Lets we take a look to Joshua when he raze the wall of Jericho. He chose the first option. Because he trusted the Lord, he disregarded all his military experience and adopted God’s bizarre battle plan. Over the years, he had learned that the Lord is trustworthy.”

Trust and obey is my favorite hymn song as well and there is an interesting fact behind this song. Here’s the story behind of Trust and Obey…

One night in the mid-1880s, when Dwight L. Moody was preaching in Brockton, Massachusetts, his “team” opened the floor, requesting spontaneous testimonies from the audience. A nervous young man stood and expressed his doubts and then his intentions: “I am not quite sure, but I am going to trust, and I am going to obey.”

Daniel Towner, Moody’s musician was so struck by the power of those simple words that he quickly jotted them down, and then delivered them to John Sammis, who developed the lyrics to Trust and Obey.  Initially, Sammis just wrote four lines refrain to “Trust and Obey” but later he added four verses. Towner composed the music and the song quickly became a favorite. It remains popular with hymn singers today.

Trust and Obey. There are two duties in these sentences, each with equal importance, both faith and obedience. As with many such verses, there is also a clear progression. Although obedience is critical, everything begins with faith. In the matter of salvation, one can never work his way to Heaven. We are born again when we “Trust in the LORD.” That regenerating work will manifest itself in the desire and ability to “do well.” There is also a clear balance for godly living in this profound and inspired statement. It presents the absolute necessity of both faith and obedience. Of course, faith is not passive; but living faith will result in obedience to Christ. At the same time, the effort to “do well” is not in conflict with faith or a replacement for it.

In the Christian life, faith and works complement each other. We have all witnessed the imbalance of those who claim to be relying on God, and yet they are unwilling to obey the commands of the Word of God. We have also known those who were zealously committed to doing what they perceived to be right, but without the essential presence of faith and dependence upon God. You have probably heard the familiar saying which embodies this principle, “Pray as if everything depends on God, and work as though everything depends on you.” The remainder of this text promises great blessing for those who will “Trust in the LORD, and do good.” Amen

 “Trust in the Lord and do good; dwell in the land and enjoy safe pasture. Take delight in the Lord, and he will give you the desires of your heart. Commit your way to the Lord; trust in him and he will do this:  He will make your righteous reward shine like the dawn, your vindication like the noonday sun. Be still before the Lord and wait patiently for him; do not fret when people succeed in their ways, when they carry out their wicked schemes.” (Psalm 37:3-7)

“Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight” (Proverb 3:5-6)

Lord, I’m not always “quite sure” and yet I choose to trust you with my life. As I walk the path of obedience, fill my heart with joy, eagerly expecting your favor and blessing.

To listening “Trust and obey” Please click the link below

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0S8Z-dMM40

Karina

Photo credit: Google Images

 

 

 

 

To God Be the Glory

to god be the glory

Yesterday night I share a comment in Sue Nash blog about a hymn song called “To God Be the Glory” This  hymn song became one of my favorite songs from the hundreds favorite hymn song and I will use as my wedding theme song on December later. Why I and my fiancé choose this song? Because first, this song always reminds us How marvelous God’s work and also gives special place to the Free Grace position—that salvation is provided as a gift from God to everyone who will place his or her faith in Christ, regardless of one’s sins before or after conversion. The second reason, this is our gratitude to Lord Jesus Christ who has been gave us wonderful and marvelous blessing in our life. This evening I am pleased to share our reflection of this song. Here’s…..

When we observe and ponder this song, there are several aspects of this beloved composition set it forth not only as a hymn of praise, but also as a hymn of grace. From the outset, it is clear that Fanny J. Crosby ascribes all credit to God for His work (“great things He hath done”), with no role for man’s efforts in God’s great plan. In the first stanza, it is Jesus alone who opens the life gate of salvation, so that all have the opportunity to be saved. This is a clear message of grace, in contrast to the idea that man must prove his worth before eternal life is granted.

However, it is in the second stanza that Crosby most clearly sets forth the conditions for entrance through this gate—faith, and faith alone. Note that redemption is promised to “every believer” ( John 3:16), and that regardless of the magnitude of one’s sins, even “the vilest offender” who puts his or her faith in Christ, such as the criminal crucified with Christ (Luke 23:43) or Saul of Tarsus (1 Tim 1:15), will immediately receive pardon from Jesus.

The third stanza and chorus continue to bring this point of grace home, proclaiming that it is God who has done great things, and the One to whom praise and adoration belong. As is evident here, as well as in her other hymns, Fanny J. Crosby were a great woman of God who clearly understood the importance of God’s marvelous grace in salvation. The act of love on the cross which made this possible is truly reason to “Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, let the earth hear His voice! Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, let the people rejoice!” Let us indeed rejoice in our salvation provided so freely by Christ Jesus!

Fanny J.Crosby wrote this song lyric based on Ephesians 3:20-21: “Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to His power that is at work within us, to Him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, forever and ever! Amen.”

To God be the glory, great things He hath done;
So loved He the world that He gave us His Son,
Who yielded His life, an atonement for sin,
And opened the life gate, that all may go in.

O perfect redemption, the purchase of blood,
To every believer, the promise of God;
The vilest offender who truly believes,
That moment from Jesus a pardon receives.

Great things He hath taught us, great things He hath done,
And great our rejoicing through Jesus the Son;
But purer, and higher, and greater will be
Our wonder, our transport, when Jesus we see!

Refrain:
Praise the Lord, praise the Lord,
Let the earth hear His voice!
Praise the Lord, praise the Lord,
Let the people rejoice!
O come to the Father, through Jesus the Son,
And give Him the glory, great things He hath done!

Fanny J. Crosby (1820-1915) William H. Doane (1832-1915)

Karina – Kevin Lam

Watch and listen this great Hymn song “To God Be the Glory”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3qcyNUqdxA&list=RD02NKex7c7DzMA

With permission from Greg Howlett this music will be use in our holy matrimony

Photo credit: christianwallpaper.com

 

 

 

 

 

How Great Thou Art

How great thou art

The hymn How Great Thou Art traveled a long road before it ended up a favorite edition to English hymnals. The original version was a poem written by a Swedish pastor, Reverend Carl Boberg in 1886, and entitled O Stor Gud. Boberg published the poem in his periodical Sanningsvittnet. Several years later he was surprised and delighted to hear his poem being sung by a church congregation, to the tune of an old Swedish folk melody.

Boberg’s poem was soon thereafter translated into German by Manfred von Glehn, who entitled it Wie gross bist Du. In 1925, an American Reverend E. Gustav Johnson translated the Swedish poem into an English version that is somewhat different than the one popular today. For instance, the first line of Johnson’s hymn reads Oh mighty God, when I behold the wonder..

In 1927, I.S. Prokanoff translated Glehn’s German version into Russian, to be enjoyed by that culture also. Throughout all of these translations, the original Swedish folk tune remained the same.

In 1933, English missionaries to the Ukraine, Reverend and Mrs. Stuart K. Hine heard the song for the first time, fell in love with it and sang it often throughout their missionary journeys. As they traveled the Carpathian Mountains, the couple was inspired by the incredible beauty to translate the first three verses of the song into English. When WWII broke out in 1939, the Hines returned to England carrying How Great Thou Art to its new home. After the war they wrote the fourth verse and arranged the original Swedish folk tune to be published in English hymnals.

In the 1950s, the song was copyrighted and widely published in America, becoming more and more popular. When George Beverly Shay and the Billy Graham gospel choir, directed by Cliff Barrows, began to sing the song at virtually every crusade event, How Great Thou Art soon became one of the most recognized songs around the world. It was also recorded by several popular artists, including Elvis Presley. A poll conducted by the Christian Herald magazine in 1974 named How Great Thou Art the most popular hymn in America.

Oh Lord my God
When I in awesome wonder
consider all the works
Thy hands have made
I see the stars
I hear the rolling thunder
Thy power throughout
the universe displayed

Chorus :

Then sings my soul
My Savior, God, to Thee
How great Thou art
How great Thou art
Then sings my soul
My Savior, God, to Thee
How great Thou art
How great Thou art

And When I think, of God,
His son not sparing,
Sent Him to die,
I scarce can take it in;
That on the cross, my burden
gladly bearing He bled and died
to take away my sin
Chorus

When Christ shall come
With shout of acclamation
And take me home
What joy shall fill my heart
Then I shall bow
With humble adoration
And then proclaim My God
How great Thou art
Chorus

Watch and listen “How Great Thou Art “Live concert from Royal Albert Hall, London

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBLRsUMtuFQ&list=RD02dBLRsUMtuFQ

Karina

Photo credit: keypoulanmusic.com

Abide with me

abide-with-me

When I worship this morning there was a song sung by the congregation called “Abide with me” Like another Hymn song I know this touching heart song so well. This beautiful song was composed by Henry Francis Lyte and William Henry Monk. Below the short story behind “ Abide with me”

Henry Francis Lyte (1793-1847) and his wife Ann were faithful pastors of a little fishing town in Devonshire England, for 23 years. Although Henry’s health was compromised, he worked tirelessly ministering to his parish, taking care of his family, and writing poems and hymns.

In 1844, Henry was diagnosed with Tuberculosis. Over the next three years his physical condition deteriorated until finally on September 4, 1847, at the age of 54, he stood in the pulpit for the last time to deliver his farewell message.

That same afternoon, after taking a walk on the beach, Henry retired to his room. He emerged about an hour later with a written copy of Abide With Me. He left soon after for a trip to Italy, to get away from the cold, damp coastal weather. While en route to his destination, he mailed a revised copy of Abide With Me to his wife. A few days later while resting in a hotel on the French Riviera, Henry went home to be with Jesus. A fellow clergyman who was with Henry during his final hours reported that Henry’s last words were Peace! Joy!

Abide With Me was put to music by William H. Monk (1823-1889), and made its debut at Henry’s memorial service.

The hymn has since been popular within many Christian denominations. It was reported to have been a favorite of King George V, and of Mahatma Gandhi. It was sung at the weddings of King George VI and of Queen Elizabeth II. It is sung before kickoff at every FA Cup Final and Rugby League, and at various annual celebrations in Austria, New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom. It has been recorded by various jazz and gospel music artists, and has been included in the soundtrack of no less than 10 movies and television shows, including Shane and Touched by an Angel.

As He often does, God took the sad ending of a life and made something lasting and beautiful.

“But they urged him strongly, “Stay with us, for it is nearly evening; the day is almost over.” So he went in to stay with them.” (Luke 24:29)

Abide With Me

Abide with me; fast falls the eventide;
the darkness deepens; Lord, with me abide.
When other helpers fail and comforts flee,
Help of the helpless, O abide with me.

Swift to its close ebbs out life’s little day;
earth’s joys grow dim; its glories pass away;
change and decay in all around I see;
O thou who changest not, abide with me.

I need thy presence every passing hour.
What but thy grace can foil the tempter’s power?
Who, like thyself, my guide and stay can be?
Through cloud and sunshine, Lord, abide with me.

I fear no foe, with thee at hand to bless;
ills have no weight, and tears not bitterness.
Where is death’s sting? Where, grave, thy victory?
I triumph still, if thou abide with me.

Hold thou thy cross before my closing eyes;
shine through the gloom and point me to the skies.
Heaven’s morning breaks, and earth’s vain shadows flee;
in life, in death, O Lord, abide with me.

Note: Above is the complete verse of “Abide with Me”. Sometime a choir or singers perform this song without the complete verse such as Hayley Westenra sings this beautiful song below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bqrRNowf1Q

Karina

Photo credit: Google image

 

Under His Wings

under his wings

I got an email from Kimiko my very best friend in Japan. She sent me a song lyric “Under His Wings”. She said: “My dear Karin, read and ponder this lyric carefully.” She sent me this morning because last night I called her and shared the problems that I had now.  Dear friends, when I heard this song and pondering I could not hold back my tears. I cried. I do not cry for my problems but I am crying because I am more realized that I have God in Heaven with His wings are always covered me in every step of my life.

This evening, I am longing to share this song to all of you.This song amazingly is able to strengthen us when we are weak. At the moment we are experiencing many trials and problems. Thank you so much for my best friend Kimiko who sending me this beautiful and encouraging song.

My way was filled with danger, I felt alone
The enemy had singled me out to do me wrong
And when he drew near, my heart filled with fear
Then I heard someone dear calling me to his side
And I ran under His wings, and there He covered Me
And now I can sing
The enemy still looks for me, but what he can’t see
Is that I’m under my Lords wings, under His wings


Thunder rolled, dark clouds hung low, I was out
In a storm, shivering in the coldness there, no safe
Retreat from harm, then there blew strong winds
Would this be my end, then I heard my friend calling
Me to His side, and I ran under his wings and there
He covered me and now I can sing
The storm still rages, but in the Rock of Ages I’m resting
Warmly, here under My Lords wings, under His wings


Night time came, the shadows fell, I could not
Find my way, the terrors of the night took hold
How I yearned for break of day, then he saw my plight
And out in the night He shined His light and called me to
His side, and I ran under His wings, and there he covered me
And now I can sing
And the night’s still there but why should I care, when
I’m made aware that I’m under my Lords wings
Under His wings, and there He covers me and now I
Can Sing,


Under His wings, Under His wings, who from His love
Can sever, Under His wings, my soul shall abide
Safely abide, forever, Amen.

Watch and listen The Sisters sing “Under His Wings”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUBV4BAZAC0

Karina

Photo Credit:gnfaww.blogspot.com

It is Well With My Soul

It is well with my soulYesterday evening I gave a comment to Sue Nash ’s Blog (one of my favorite and inspiration blog), I give a comment about one of my favorite hymns song called “It is Well With My Soul” composed by Horatio Gates Spafford (1828-1888) and Philip Paul Bliss (1838-1876). I really like this song because I know the background of it very well. Here’s the short story behind it song.

Horatio Spafford (1828-1888) was a wealthy Chicago lawyer with a thriving legal practice, a beautiful home, a wife, four daughters and a son. He was also a devout Christian and faithful student of the Scriptures. His circle of friends included Dwight L. Moody, Ira Sankey and various other well-known Christians of the day.

At the very height of his financial and professional success, Horatio and his wife Anna suffered the tragic loss of their young son. Shortly thereafter on October 8, 1871, the Great Chicago Fire destroyed almost every real estate investment that Spafford had.

In 1873, Spafford scheduled a boat trip to Europe in order to give his wife and daughters a much needed vacation and time to recover from the tragedy. He also went to join Moody and Sankey on an evangelistic campaign in England. Spafford sent his wife and daughters ahead of him while he remained in Chicago to take care of some unexpected last minute business. Several days later he received notice that his family’s ship had encountered a collision. All four of his daughters drowned; only his wife had survived.

With a heavy heart, Spafford boarded a boat that would take him to his grieving Anna in England. It was on this trip that he penned those now famous words, When sorrow like sea billows roll; it is well, it is well with my soul. Philip Bliss (1838-1876), composer of many songs including Hold the Fort, Let the Lower Lights be Burning, and Jesus Loves Even Me, was so impressed with Spafford’s life and the words of his hymn that he composed a beautiful piece of music to accompany the lyrics. The song was published by Bliss and Sankey, in 1876.

For more than a century, the tragic story of one man has given hope to countless thousands who have lifted their voices to sing; It Is Well With My Soul.

When peace, like a river, attendeth my way,
When sorrows like sea billows roll;
Whatever my lot, Thou has taught me to say,
It is well, it is well, with my soul.
It is well, with my soul,
It is well, it is well, with my soul.

Though Satan should buffet, though trials should come,
Let this blest assurance control,
That Christ has regarded my helpless estate,
And hath shed His own blood for my soul.

My sin, oh, the bliss of this glorious thought!
My sin, not in part but the whole,
Is nailed to the cross, and I bear it no more,
Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, O my soul!

For me, be it Christ, be it Christ hence to live:
If Jordan above me shall roll,
No pang shall be mine, for in death as in life
Thou wilt whisper Thy peace to my soul.

But, Lord, ’tis for Thee, for Thy coming we wait,
The sky, not the grave, is our goal;
Oh, trump of the angel! Oh, voice of the Lord!
Blessed hope, blessed rest of my soul!

And Lord, haste the day when my faith shall be sight,
The clouds be rolled back as a scroll;
The trump shall resound, and the Lord shall descend,
Even so, it is well with my soul.

It is Well with My Soul by “Together for the Gospel Live” from Sovereign Grace Music.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHe_qmo3gX4

Story source: sharefaith.com

Photo credit: glazedfromtheheart.blogspot.com

Karina